Daniel Pipes & Amy Dockser marcus
Thursday, March 27
6:30p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Old South Meeting House

The Arab-Israeli conflict is century old and still not resolved. The dispute between Israeli Jews and Palestinian Arabs over the same land — land that contains holy sites for the three major monotheistic religious: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — is bitter and deep. What is the nature of current tensions? What are their implications for U.S. policy? Tonight, Pulitzer Prize-winning Wall Street Journal reporter Amy Dockser Marcus and Dr. Daniel Pipes, director of the Middle East Forum and a columnist for the New York Times Syndicate , focus on United States diplomacy in this conflict, debating whether it has been part of a peace provess or a war provess.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.
This program is presented in collaboration with the Old South meeting House as part of the partners in Public Dialogue Series.

Anita F. Hill
Thursday, March 20
6:30p.m. – 8:00p.m.
Boston Public Library, Rabb Lecture Hall

As a laywer, scholar, and vivil rights activist. Professor Anita F. Hill, Brandies University, has shed light on the legal and social forces shaping our nation and served as an inspiration to those seeking justice and truth in the face of great personal risk. Launched into the public sphere by her testimony in Justice Clarence Thomas’s Supreme Court Confirmation hearing, she used her potentially crippling experience to encourage those who have suffered from haassment and discrimination in the workplace to also “speak truth to power.” She First Amendment Aard and share her thoughts on her life and work. Moderated by Professor Charles J. Ogletree, Harvard University Law School.

Panel discussion. Speakers to be determined.

Thursday, November 13
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Old South Meeting House

Obama. McCain. Who will be sitting in the Oval Office on January 21, 2009? What does it mean for the future of our country? Supreme Court justices. The economy. Foreign policy. Global warming. Nuclear proliferation. Abortion. Energy security. Join us as we unravel the deciding factors that led one candidate into the winner’s circle — and then look forward to its impact on the coming years for our nation.

This program is presented in collaboration with the Old South Meeting House as part of the Partners in Public Dialogue Series.

Gary Hirshberg with Nancy F. Koehn
Thursday, November 6
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
C. Walsh Theater, Suffolk University

Can one really do well by doing good? Savvy corporations of all sectors and sizes are now embracing an environmentally friendly outlook. Adobe is striving to make its campus carbon neutral. Car manufacturers are flocking to catch-up with Toyota’s hybrid Prius. Even Wal-Mart has retrofitted its stores with high-efficiency lighting systems. What are the incentives for entrepreneurs and business owners to “go green”? And what are the challenges they face as they seek to provide value for shareholders while staying true to their mission and morals? Gary Hirshberg, Chairman, President and CEO of Stonyfield Farm, joins Professor Nancy F. Koehn, Harvard Business School, to discuss how businesses are leveraging quality products, creative marketing, and cost-saving efficiencies to both enrich shareholders and make the world a better place.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.

James Carroll
Thursday, October 30
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
C. Walsh Theater, Suffolk University

Why are intolerance, violence and war so deeply ingrained in religion? Constantine’s Sword, the latest film by Oscar-nominated documentarian Oren Jacoby, follows James Carroll, Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at Suffolk University, Boston Globe columnist, and author of the forthcoming book Practicing Catholic, in his search for answers to this question. Looking to his own past and that of his religion, Carroll addresses the darker side of Christianity and explores the consequences of the religion’s influence on United States foreign policy. In what ways can religion inspire us to be better people? How can it lead us astray? And where do we, as a society, draw the lines between our religion and public life? James Carroll joins us to screen the film and address the blessings and perils of religion.

Douglas J. Feith
Thursday, October 23
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Old South Meeting House

The following warnings appeared in a 2002 Bush administration memorandum:
• “US could fail to find WMD on the ground in Iraq.”
• “Post-Saddam stabilization and reconstruction efforts by the United States could take not two to four years, but eight to ten years.”
• “Iraq could experience ethnic strife among Kurds, Sunnis, and Shia…”
The author? It was Donald Rumsfeld, former United States Secretary of Defense, in a powerful analysis of the downsides of going to war in Iraq. Why then, did one of the decade’s most important foreign policy decisions go the other way? Douglas J. Feith, former United States Undersecretary of Defense for Policy (2001 – 2005), joins us tonight to discuss the dynamics of the first Bush term, and how we make foreign policy decisions.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.

This program is presented in collaboration with the Old South Meeting House as part of the Partners in Public Dialogue Series.

Jon Keller with Jeff Jacoby
Sunday, October 5
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
C. Walsh Theater at Suffolk University

Massachusetts. It is the proud birthplace of modern-day liberalism, and the nation’s foremost test kitchen for its agenda and political practices. It is also, some say, home to sluggish economic growth, insular political culture, and a government that often fails to deliver relief for the working-class people it claims to help the most. Are Massachusetts politics an ideal others should strive toward? Or have we led the rest of the country (or at least its Democrats) dangerously off course? Tonight Jon Keller, WBZ-TV News’ Political Analyst, joins Jeff Jacoby, Boston Globe columnist, to review the ups and downs of our beloved state’s political culture and what can be done to carve out a “new frontier” of American leadership.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.

Laurence H. Tribe
Thursday, September 25
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Moot Court Room, Suffolk University Law School

Between the lines of our parchment Constitution, renowned legal scholar Laurence Tribe argues, there is an “Invisible Constitution.” Tribe purports that some of our most cherished and widely held beliefs about our constitutional rights are not even included in the written document. How does this “Invisible Constitution” impact the central constitutional debates of our time – from gun control to abortion to wire-tapping? How has this framework for reading the Constitution evolved, and how does it work? Professor Laurence Tribe, Harvard Law School, joins us to discuss how we interpret our country’s most important document.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.

Receive a free copy of the U.S. Constitution at the door.

Jimmy Wales with Christopher Lydon
Thursday, September 11
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
C. Walsh Theater, Suffolk University

Across the globe we are building, editing, and contributing to a growing body of knowledge and tools at everyone’s fingertips. Volunteers in leaderless organizations contribute to online initiatives and articles. Software developers spend their free time collaborating with complete strangers. Amazingly, these efforts are creating products of extraordinary quality, sometimes better than that of large for-profit organizations. Why do we do it? Why does it work? Join us tonight as Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales joins journalist Christopher Lydon to address these questions, where “web 2.0” will take us next, and how Objectivist philosophy guides his vision.

Thomas S. Blanton with Alasdair Roberts
Thursday, September 18
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
C. Walsh Theater, Suffolk University

Over the last eight years, Federal policymakers have struggled with contending claims about national security, executive privilege, and open government. Is the current administration excessively secretive? Or are its methods simply the most effective way to protect our nation in the post-9/11 world? Tonight, in recognition of International Right to Know Day, Thomas S. Blanton, Director of the National Security Archive at George Washington University, joins Professor Alasdair Roberts, Suffolk University Law School, to discuss government transparency and suggest top reform priorities for the next President.

Book signing will follow lecture and discussion.